2 Super Simple Ways to Help Families Build Relationships within the Church

refreshblogdecember30th

You need people to reach people.

It’s the people who attend your church that enable you to effectively reach your community.

But you don’t just need people, you need committed people, people who buy into your church’s mission and genuinely desire to carry it out.

The family who rushes in on Sunday and rushes out as soon as the service ends will not help you reach the lost.

It’s commitment that makes the difference in evangelism, and it’s commitment that makes the difference in whether people will stick to your church or exit out the back door.

So what is the key to commitment?

At our church, we believe it’s relationships.

We believe that if a family has at least one other family in the church whom they are close to, they will stick around through thick and thin.

Therefore, one of our biggest goals is to help families, new and old, form at least one strong relationship with another family in the church.

Here are 2 super simple ways we do that on Sunday mornings.

1. Build relationships by doing checkout from Small Group rooms

Depending on your space this can be tricky, but it’s well worth it to figure it out.

We used to end Small Groups and dismiss our kids from their Small Group rooms to our Large Group environment for free time, then we’d call them out when their parents arrived.

But this made it easy for families parents to slip in and out sans any meaningful interactions.

So to encourage parents to interact with each other, we stopped dismissing Small Groups to the Large Group environment.

Instead, we started sending parents straight to our Small Group rooms for pickup.

Then when a parent comes to pick up their kids, we invite the kids to stick around and play in the Large Group space.

We’ve worked hard to create a fun Large Group environment, so kids beg their parents to stick around and let them play for a little.

Meanwhile the parents have nothing to do, but wait for their kids and talk with the parents of the other kids who are also playing.

It’s been amazing to see parents who normally come and go with barely a word, standing and talking with other parents after service and building relationships.

2. Build relationships by having snacks after a kid’s service

One time per month we provide snacks in our Large Group environment for kids and parents to enjoy.

It piggy backs off the first strategy, but there’s just something about adding food to the mix that helps kickstart conversations.

Families also stick around even longer than normal because they have something to curb their appetites.

We do it 1x/month because of the cost, but you could do it even more often if your budget allows or you people willing to donate food and drinks.

How do you help families build relationships on Sundays? Leave a comment.

And if this was helpful to you, please share it with others on Facebook.

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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