Church Invites that Kids Actually Use

Invites

“Take this home and invite a friend to our [special event] next Sunday,” we say as the kids are literally walking out with their parents.

Then the next day we still find half of them laying around the church, and when we ask the kids the next week who handed theirs out…crickets.

Have you ever faced similar frustrations?

We still haven’t completely figured this out, but we did try something new recently that made a marked difference.

Instead of designing invites in-house with a slick graphic, printing them off, and handing them to kids at checkout; we had the kids (and volunteers) perform some simple origami and hand write the invites.

The invites were for our Fall Festival (the picture above is an example, and you can find the Youtube tutorial here and last weeks post was on doing a Fall Festival DURING Church which you can check out here), but there are tons of videos on Youtube with simple origami designs you can find for almost any occasion.

We found that because our kids actually made the invitation and wrote it out themselves, they became excited to deliver it to a friend.

Rather than getting a piece of paper shoved in their hands as they left, they had ownership of the invite.

In other words, it became too important to them to throw out and not use.

With that said, even simple origami isn’t super easy, so here’s how we got our volunteers ready and then taught our kids.

Step 1: Purchase origami paper.

We picked it up on Amazon.

In the past, we used construction paper and even colored printer paper, but neither was thin enough and ended up not working nearly as well.

Step 2: Find the simplest design possible online for whatever you want to do (bird, pumpkin, etc).

My first stop is always Youtube because a video is easier to follow along with than a diagram.

There’ll inevitably be multiple designs for whatever you’re looking for; take your time and find the easiest, most simple one.

Step 3: Send the video to a few volunteers and ask them to learn it.

We’ve found that there enough time for one person to teach 2 Small Groups, so you don’t need every Small Group leader to learn.

Step 4: Gather as many leaders together as possible before your Small Group time on Sunday and show them how to make the origami

You don’t have to completely teach them how to do it.

You just want them to become familiar with the process, so they can help kids during Small Group time.

Step 5: Give each kid a piece of paper and have a leader walk them through the process

Some kids will need help, which is why it’s good to have as many leaders as possible at least familiar with the process.

Step 6: Once each kid has made at least one origami [fill-in-the-blank], have them write the information on whatever they made and sign it.

This way both the origami and the writing is handmade.

The kids take ownership to actually hand it out.

And their friends (and their friends’ parents) see a very personal invitation.

Do you have any creative ways for your kids to invite their friends to special events? Leave a comment with what you do!

If this post was helpful, please pass it along by sharing on Facebook.

The following two tabs change content below.

Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

Comments

comments

Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

You may also like...