How to Measure Success in Kid’s Ministry

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Success in Kid’s Ministry can be difficult to measure.

Often time looking at numbers is the simplest and easiest way, but numbers don’t give you the whole picture and leave a lot of unanswered questions:

How do you know if lives are truly being changed?

How do you know if the kids are growing as disciples?

How do you know if parents feel like you’re helping them to grow as spiritual leaders in their families?

How do you know if families in the church are participating in personal evangelism?

I remember the first time I was presented with these questions and how I had no idea, but over time, with a tons of help, and through a lot of trial and error, we came up with some really simple, effective ways to measure success within our Kid’s Ministry.

Here’s what we came up with:

1. Use Small Groups to measure life-change, evangelism, and growing discipleship.

Every week we ask the kids in small groups the 5 same questions:

Did anyone start following Jesus today?

Did anyone invite a friend this week?

Who did their devotionals this week?

Does anyone have a prayer request to share?

Who would like to pray?

Through these questions we get a sense of how kid’s are living out their faith and how they’re investing into personal time with God.

2. Use volunteers to measure the effectiveness of your ministry in kids’ lives.

Every week we ask volunteers to answer 1 question: What was your favorite thing that happened today?

One of my favorite things to do on Monday is read the responses.

Whether or not we had a good attendance or a lot of guests or none, there’s inevitably a meaningful and awesome interaction that happened between a volunteer and a child.

And if I get consistent responses from volunteers that don’t have stories of life-change, I know we are getting off track somewhere and need to realign.

3. Use parents to measure how well you’re partnering with families as a whole.

We do 3 things.

First, we write down any unsolicited feedback we receive from parents.

Second, we look at how many parents are opening the weekly parenting article we send out.

Third, and this is probably the most helpful thing we do, we take families out to lunch at least 2 times/month and simply ask them how we’re doing and how we can help them better.

Parents love that we care enough to ask, and they provide really helpful feedback, and give us great ideas to be more successful.

What are some ways you measure success in Kid’s Ministry?

Leave a comment.

 

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

Comments

comments

Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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2 Responses

  1. Magen says:

    How do you know if parents are opening the parenting article you send out? Every week I hand out a take home paper when the parents pick up the kids. Usually it’s s family devotion. It has our weekly bible verse and ways for the parents snd kids to engage/ talk about what we discussed on Sunday morning. I am not sure how to measure the effectiveness of doing this.

    • brandon.horst12@gmail.com says:

      We send the email article using a service called Mailchimp which gives you a report that lists every person who opens it. We hand out Devotionals on Sunday too, and it’s really hard to evaluate. Mostly we evaluate the physical handouts through parents telling us how it’s helped, and we also ask parents if handouts are helpful when we take a family out to lunch. Hope that helps!

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