How to Minister to Your Leaders Just as Much as Your Kids in Your Services

Have you ever thought deeply about the role of your leaders, particularly within your Large Group setting?

I didn’t until recently.

In the past, I always thought of their role as mostly crowd control.

Sure, every so often we’d use them as volunteers for a story, game or object lesson, but for the mos,t part their job was to take care of distractions and make sure the kids were paying attention.

Basically, I viewed them as an invisible helping presence.

That’s how it was at our church and that’s how it was at all the churches I’d previously served at.

It was Small Group time which was reserved for our volunteers to have meaningful interactions.

As I thought about all this, it dawned on me that the model we were doing basically cut our volunteers out of 50-60% of our Sunday services.

So recently we started experimenting with ways we could include volunteers in ALL of the service.

Here are 3 things we’ve done.

1. We’ve started having kids and volunteers sit together with their Small Groups in Large Group

You may already do this, but we didn’t until recently.

This gives our large group leaders the opportunity to kick things to the small group leaders whenever they feel it’s appropriate.

2. We started addressing our volunteers directly in the large group.

This goes hand-in-hand with having Small Groups sit together.

Whenever the Large Group leader has the Small Groups do something, the Large Group leader will first address our leaders.

Here’s an example:

The Large Group leader asks, “What are ways we can show love to people who are mean to us? Leaders, I want you to brainstorm some ideas with your group right now. We’ll put up a 3-minute countdown for you to discuss.”

This has added really meaningful responsibility to what our leaders do within the Large Group.

An added bonus is that it gives our me and other Large Group leaders an opportunity to observe volunteers leading discussions and train them in how to get better at it.

3. We started asking our volunteers to model what it practically looks like to be led by the Holy Spirit

Let’s continue from the previous example.

At the end of 3 minutes, the Large Group leader may say something like, “Leaders, if any of you are sensing that the Holy Spirit wants you to share an answer that one of your kids gave, let’s go ahead and do that now.”

Leaders will then raise their hands and share with the group as well as encourage and celebrate the kid who gave the answer.

This challenges our leaders to step out in faith and model to the kids what it looks like to be practically led by the Holy Spirit.

All in all, this has really made a difference in the atmosphere of our Large Groups.

But it has also ministered powerfully to our leaders, by helping them to become more mature in their faith and challenging them to model a Spirit-led life.

Application Question: In the next 2 weeks, when could you experiment with including your volunteers in your Large Group more meaningfully?

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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