4 Lessons from Chick-fil-A About Kid’s Min

Kid's Min

Chick-fil-A is known for great chicken and great service, but how does that translate to Kid’s Min?

It’s not so much the product (chicken) that translates; it’s how they run their organization and how they treat people, both of which are very translatable.

Here’s 4 lessons we’ve learned (and applied in our Kid’s Min) from Chick-fil-A.

1. Care About Excellence in Everything

Chick-fil-A strives to be excellent in every area.

They don’t just want the best chicken sandwich, they want the best sides, service, employees, facilities, speed, efficiency, work environment, customer environment, etc., etc.

Chick-fil-A wants to be the best at everything they do, and it pays off in repeat business and new customers.

I bet your Kid’s Min is excellent in some ways, but is it excellent in every way?

Are you great at Large Groups, but not so hot at Small Groups?

Are you really good at creating an amazing experience for regular attenders, but drop the ball too often with guests?

Are you excellent at partnering with families, but don’t relate well with volunteers?

Are you even sure where you’re excellent and where you’re not?

At the church where I serve, I don’t know if we’ve really achieved excellence in any area, but we’re always making small (and sometimes big) changes to improve; we’re always chasing excellence.

And not just in 1 area, but in every area.

Just this past month, we’ve made changes to our Large Group, Small Groups, volunteer care and training, guest follow-up, how we partner with parents, and digital content design.

But we don’t make changes for the sake of change; we make changes for the sake of excellence.

What changes do you need to make?

2. Care About People More than Results

Don’t get me wrong, Chic-fil-A wouldn’t be around if the results weren’t there; you have to make money to survive as a business.

But the results are a byproduct rather than the goal for Chick-fil-A.

Their philosophy is to create such a great experience for customers that those same customers demand they build more Chick-fil-A’s.

And that philosophy has served them very well and propelled them to the success they’re seeing today.

In ministry this concept sounds like common sense, but I know personally that results can become king in the church.

I remember we went through a frustrating season in our Kid’s Min where we weren’t seeing many guests, so we began trying everything we could think of to get more families to come while mostly ignoring the ones we already had.

Then 1 day God said to me: “Have you ever thought about taking really good care of the people you already have and trusting me to send new families? So when new families come, you’ll know how to take really good care of them too.”

It was a humbling experience for me because I realized that I was overlooking the families already in the church just to satisfy my ego for bigger numbers.

3. Care About Training Your Volunteers

If you’ve been to many Chick-fil-A’s you might be amazed that no matter the location, their employees are friendly, hard-working, and competent.

This isn’t just good luck.

Chick-fil-A takes the hiring process, orientation, and ongoing training very seriously.

And as a result, they consistently have great employees.

To have consistently great volunteers, you need to have the same intentionality.

You might feel like creating a process like Chick-fil-A’s at your church would scare potential volunteers away (and you’re already hurting for volunteers), but the opposite is actually true.

Great volunteers are drawn to great cultures, and creating great training for volunteers is what leads to a great culture.

When I first started in Kid’s Min, doing an orientation for new volunteers wasn’t even  on my radar, until one day a volunteer came up to me and said, “You know, it would have been really helpful if you’d done some sort of orientation when I came onboard.”

Since then, we’ve put a process into place to help our volunteers start off right and continue to grow.

For any volunteer looking to join our Kid’s Min team, we have a single sheet of paper with all our positions described in 1 sentence along with the time commitment (Example: Small Group leaders must commit to at least 1 years for 3xs/month).

For orientation, we send an email with all our guidelines and procedures, a video explaining their role, and then pair them with another volunteer in a similar role to show them the ropes.

For ongoing training, we have our volunteers gather in groups during the large group story, and talk about 1 thing each week they can do to be better (learn more about this here: How Your Volunteers can Prep, Grow, and Build Relationships…In Service)

4, Care About Caring

The final thing Chick-fil-A has taught me about Kid’s Min is to be relentless about caring about caring.

To continually strive for excellence in everything, to care about people, and to train volunteers well on an ongoing basis can be exhausting.

And to keep it up, you have to care an awful lot.

This lesson is more about discipline than anything else.

Maybe at some point along the line, you made a decision to stop caring, at least as much as you used to.

If so, you can decide right now that you’re going to recommit to care about caring.

You can determine that you’re going to keep caring, even if the results don’t come as fast as you’d like.

Because God calls us to excellence and then to trust him with the results (not as an excuse, but through trust) even if they aren’t what we envision.

I’d love for you to leave a comment!

And if this was helpful to you, it would help me out if you took a quick second to share!

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

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