How to Do a Volunteer Huddle When Volunteers Won’t Come Early

Bringing volunteers together is important, especially on Sundays.

It’s a chance to cast vision, share community, and pray together.

But it’s also really hard (at least at our church) to get volunteers to come early, so we can bring everyone together.

And then there’s the chaos of multiple services where, even if volunteers do come early, the transition from one service to the next is more of a blurred line with no gap, than truly “separate” services.

So do we just acknowledge volunteer huddles are a great idea in an ideal world, but in reality aren’t really possible?

Or is there another angle?

In a previous post, I talked about another angle we tried, where we did a volunteer huddle during our story time and landing.

But we got consistent feedback from volunteers that they felt disconnected from the kids and what was happening in the broader service.

We still like the idea of our volunteers meeting during Large Group, since all the volunteers are present by that point and check-in is mostly done (especially for guests who normally come early).

But we also want our volunteers to be live in the room for the landing, response, and worship time.

So we decided to make a couple small tweaks to what we were doing before.

Instead of waiting for our story to start, we begin the huddle exactly 10 minutes after our service start time.

We have all volunteers except the host, tech person, and service coordinator participate in the huddle.

We do it right by check-in (so we can still check-in any late families), and we have everyone standing for it (because standing meetings go quicker).

We do 3 things:

1) We read our 3 big volunteer goals.

2) We read through the Small Group Activity for any leader who didn’t look at the schedule beforehand (I know, you don’t have this problem at your church).

3) We share prayer requests, write them down, and pray.

Then we dismiss everyone back into the Large Group room.

We have leaders sit with their Small Groups and have one volunteer hangout in the back to keep an eye out for any families who are coming 15+ minutes late (Again, I know you never have that problem at your church).

There are 6 big advantages to doing the huddle like this:

1) Volunteers can focus on kids and parents as soon as they arrive even if it’s later than the 15 minutes early we ask for.

2) We can still do late check-ins (without any volunteers missing the huddle) since the meeting is at check-in.

3) We get to remind volunteers every week what our 3 wins are.

4) We get to prepare volunteers, who didn’t look at the schedule beforehand, for Small Groups.

5) We get to know what our volunteers are praying about, so we can shepherd them.

6) Volunteers get to be present with the kids in their Small Groups for the response and worship times.

Do you struggle with getting volunteers to come early for a huddle or doing a huddle in the transition between services? What are some things you’ve done to help? Leave a comment.

And if this was helpful to you, get the word out by sharing on Facebook!

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

Comments

comments

Brandon Horst

I am passionate about family, especially my amazing wife, Hannah, my daughter, Emery, and my son Tristan. I am also passionate about helping Family Ministry Leaders lead better. I love new ideas, innovation, and collaborating with other leaders to make those ideas and innovations better. I currently serve as the Next Gen Pastor at Centerpointe Church in Fairfax, VA.

You may also like...